Batwoman: Power

The surprisingly good second season of Batwoman finally comes to an end with “Power.” Black Mask makes his big play, alliances shift and reform, there are some more surprises and nods to the comics, and one issue I’ve commented on that puts Batwoman at a disadvantage compared to most of the other Arrowverse heroes finally gets rectified.

Batwoman: Kane, Kate

Some superhero shows get kind of formulaic as they go. Batwoman, especially in the second season, has been a series of surprises, plot twists, shifting alliances, and generally shaking up the status quo.

Batwoman: I’ll Give You A Clue

I’ve been really enjoying Batwoman’s second season, and at this point, I’d put it just behind Superman and Lois for most enjoyable of the Arrowverse shows. They took a major curveball between seasons and turned it into some great new stories.

Batwoman: Initiate Self-Destruct

There have been a lot of twists and turns in the second season of Batwoman. From a new character in the starring role to a major change in the big villain to finally seeing the Batmobile (seriously, Luke, where did you think it was?), I’d say “unexpected” is a good word for just about everything that’s happened.

Batwoman: Time Off For Good Behavior

Batwoman’s second, and very impressive, season is achieving a lot of complicated and difficult things at once. They’ve replaced their lead character, reoriented the main villain, and shaken things up for a few of the supporting characters. The show is also tackling social justice issues, and doing it in a good and engaging way.

Batwoman: Rule #1

Given the events of 2020, a lot of shows have started delving more into social issues. With a Black female LGBT lead, it should come as no surprise that Batwoman is very involved in this.

Batwoman: Survived Much Worse

The second season of Batwoman has had a lot of surprising twists and turns. We’ve hit the point where all roads lead to Coryana, and now most of our characters end up there. There are showdowns and surprises, and several disappointments, leading several characters to reflect they have “Survived Much Worse.”